What a Presentation Must Do Video 2: Reward

This is the second video in the Presentation Foundation Series and will focus on why your presentation content must be a reward for your presentation audience. If you missed the first video about why a presentation needs to entertain, please click the following link: What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained? Please check out the video or skip down to read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What a Presentation Must Do Video 2

Video length 1:55 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Preparation takes time

When you prepare a presentation, you have to put in a certain amount of time and effort. This is necessary if you want to communicate your message to your audience and to confidently give your presentation. It doesn't matter what the presentation is about and who it is for. You need to put in the time and energy if you expect to get a good result.

Good presentations are good for you

Giving a successful presentation with an outcome you expect is like a reward for you. And having good presentation skills will help you on many levels, especially when it comes to work. A lot of times, people with good presentation skills are generally seen as more competent, capable and confident.

However, that's looking at how presentations are rewarding for you.

Actually, your audience deserves the reward

As important as presentations are to you, the key thing you have to focus on is how your presentations are rewarding for your audience. Whatever your presentation is and whoever it's for, the content must provide value to your audience. In other words, your presentation has to be a return on your audience's time and energy investment.

What kind of reward?

You have to be sure that your presentation content satisfies your audience's needs and expectations. You need to know who your audience is and what value they are expecting. Once you know that, add something of extra value that your audience didn't expect.

This could be extra information, tips or a step-by-step process that helps your audience solve a problem or overcome a challenge. What it is specifically will depend on the audience and situation. But in most cases there will be an opportunity to provide extra value, a reward, to your audience.

Does this take extra work on your part?

Of course it does. But the benefit is your presentation will stand out because of the extra value, the reward, that you provided. Not only that, but your audience will be much more engaged during your presentation because you are speaking their language… You are communicating in a way that shows they are important, not you.

Too many presenters focus on what they want to say and completely forget, or worse, don't care about, what the audience wants to hear.

Recap

The second thing a presentation must do is reward your audience by giving them something of extra value that they didn't expect in exchange for their time and energy investment. Take the time to understand your audience and your audience's needs. Satisfy those needs and give them something more. Your audience will be happy and you'll be happy, too.

Remember, it's not about you, it's about them.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

In the first Presentation Foundation Series video, you learned one of the three things that a presentation must do…entertain.

In this second video, you'll learn the second thing that a presentation must do…reward.

Preparing a presentation and ultimately giving a presentation is a time consuming process.

It might be something you need to do for business, school, or interviews.

A lot of times, people with good presentation skills are generally seen as more competent, capable and confident.

However, that's looking at how presentations are rewarding for you.

The key thing you have to focus on is how your presentations are rewarding for your audience.

Whatever your presentation is and whoever it's for, the content must provide value to your audience.

In other words, your presentation has to be a return on your audience's time and energy investment.

So you have to be sure that your presentation content satisfies your audience's needs and expectations.

You need to know who your audience is and what value they are expecting.

Once you know that, add something of extra value that your audience didn't expect.

Does this take extra work on your part?

Of course it does.

But the benefit is your presentation will stand out because of the extra value, the reward, that you provided.

So to recap…The second thing a presentation must do is reward your audience by giving them something of extra value that they didn't expect in exchange for their time and energy investment.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments and be sure to subscribe to my Channel or sign up for my newsletter at carlkwan.com.

Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye bye.